Drawstring Bag

Drawstring Bag
Drawstring Bag

Step 1: Getting Started

 

Crochet Patterns - Drawstring Bag

Use our fun free crochet pattern to create a versatile and simple drawstring bag, perfect for almost any hobby, outing and many other purposes. This project is great for beginners to practice using basic stitches in a fun new way to create an interesting crocheted fabric. Crochet a drawstring bag for storage, shopping, sports equipment, hobby supplies and so much more. This makes an adorable overnight bag for kids too!

Special Note: For the simple backpack pictured I adapted this pattern to use worsted weight yarn instead of No. 5 cotton. I used worsted weight yarn and a US hook size I/5.5mm for the backpack and the drawstrings. To accomplish the correct size of the original pattern dimensions, my beginning row worked with worsted yarn and an "I" hook was 53 chs, and I worked 40 rows total following the stitch pattern below. See the "Drawstring Backpack" page for my full adapted instructions.

Size: 14 1/2'' x 16"

Skill Level: Beginner - Easy

Materials: 7 oz of a fine mercerized crochet cotton; (No. 5) Size C crochet hook; 1 yd each of Red and Blue cord.

Gauge: 26 sts and 18 rows to 4" over pat worked on size C hook. To save time, take time to check gauge.

Step 2: Pattern Instructions

 

Pattern:

To make: Ch 93 and beg pat as follows:

Base row (RS) 1 hdc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in side of previous hdc by working around post of st, * skip next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 hdc in side of previous hdc, rep from * to last 2 ch, 1 hdc in last ch. Turn.

1st row Ch 1, 1 sc in each st to end. Turn.

2nd row Ch 2 to count as first hdc, skip first st, *1 hdc in next st, 1 hdc in edge of previous hdc, skip next st, rep from * to last sc, 1 hdc in last sc. Turn.

First and 2nd rows form pat and are repeated throughout.

Continue in pat until bag measures 16" from beg, ending with a 2nd row.

Work a second piece in the same way.

 

To finish:

Press each piece using a damp cloth and stretch work slightly, taking care not to pull it out of shape. Join the two pieces together by working a seam of single crochet around three sides, leaving the top open. To work the single crochet seam, insert the hook through both layers and adjust the spacing of the stitches as necessary. Wrap the threading ends of the cords with tape to avoid fraying. Then thread each length of cord through the half double rows at the top of the bag. Knot the ends of the cords and untwist them to make tassels. Dampen and trim the ends to neaten the tassels.

Step 3: Drawstring Backpack Adaption

 

Drawstring Backpack

Size: 14 1/2'' x 16"

Materials: US Hook size I/5.5mm, any worsted weight yarn in any color, (I used Red Heart basic yarn in a dark red and black for the edging and drawstrings), yarn needle

Gauge: 26 sts and 18 rows to 4" over pat worked on size C hook. To save time, take time to check gauge.

 

Pattern:

To make: Ch 53 and beg pat as follows:

Base Row (RS): 1 hdc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in side of previous hdc by working around post of st, * skip next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 hdc in side of previous hdc, rep from * to last 2 ch, 1 hdc in last ch. Turn.

1st Row: Ch 1, 1 sc in each st to end. Turn.

2nd Row: Ch 2 to count as first hdc, skip first st, *1 hdc in next st, 1 hdc in edge of previous hdc, skip next st, rep from * to last sc, 1 hdc in last sc. Turn.

1st and 2nd rows form pat and are repeated throughout.

Continue in pat until bag measures 16" from beg, ending with a 2nd row. (Including base row I worked 40 rows total, but ended my piece with row 1.)

Work a second piece in the same way.

 

To finish:

Join the two pieces together by working a seam of single crochet around three sides, leaving the top open. To work the single crochet seam, insert the hook through both layers and adjust the spacing of the stitches as necessary.

Special Note: I didn't follow the instructions for the drawstring portion from the original pattern, but came up with an alternate method. I slipped stitch to the bottom corner of the back pack and then chained a "cord" about 30 - 32" long, leaving a 12 inch tail. Then I weaved the cord through the top row of one side, finishing by using my 12 inch tail to attach the cord to the top opposite corner from where I started. I repeated the process for the other side. I love how this modification turned out, as it gives the backpack simple straps that also act as the drawstrings. See the tutorial images for clarification.

bag  bag 

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